(via The elegant art of not giving a shit)
Using fossil pollen records as an index of vegetation change, they demonstrated the (somewhat intuitive) main result that the time to recovery following a disturbance generally decreases as the past disturbance frequency increased. This appears to be a vindication of the idea that a system’s adaptive strategies evolve as a product of the local disturbance regime. More importantly, they found that recovery was faster following ‘large infrequent events’, which are natural perturbations such as cyclones and major fires. While most past disturbances were caused by humans clearing forest, the fact that tropical forest systems were most resilient to ‘natural’ events means that if we can’t stop human disturbances, at least we can attempt to emulate natural processes to maximise the rebound potential.
Tony Blair is old, older than time itself. Beyond left and right, beyond right and wrong, beyond age and death. When the first cave-dwellers made the first image of their god, Tony Blair was there with his shiny spiv’s suit to suggest that it might require a blood sacrifice. When the first half-fish heaved itself out from the boiling sea to flap around in the sodden tidal slime, Tony Blair was there with his cold intense stare to offer it words of vague encouragement and then crush its head under his heel. When the first drifting clouds of interstellar dust began to coalesce into what would one day become our little speckled world, the bodiless malice of Tony Blair was there to help them set the stage for our future suffering.
Little Germany was the first major non-Anglophone ethnic enclave in New York…. It was centred around Tompkins Square, which the Germans called der Weisse Garten (‘the White Garden’), in an area now known as Alphabet City. Eventually, it would include 400 city blocks on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Known to its inhabitants by the diminutives Kleindeutschland or Deutschländle (the second a distinctly southern German variant), Little Germany was also called Dutchtown…. To outsiders, Little Germany may have appeared a chaotic cauldron of otherness, but like many ethnic enclaves before and since, it was in fact itself a delicate balance of the regional differences back home. Germans from particular areas in the old country tended to congregate in the same neighbourhoods of their new home.
 The 10th ward saw the heaviest concentration of Prussians, who by 1880 represented about 30% of the city’s German-born population.
In the 1860s, the 13th ward was the focal point for Hessians, who later migrated north towards the 11th and 17th wards. By the 1880s, the 13th ward had become a popular destination for immigrants from Baden. And particularly for Hanoverians, who formed their own ‘Little Hanover’ in the 13th.
By the 1860s, Wurttembergers had started moving into the 17th ward, from areas further south.
Curiously, Prussians and Bavarians seemed repelled by each other’s presence. Bavarians were spread evenly throughout Little Germany, but usually inversely with Prussians. 
(via 663 - Death of Little Germany: How a Ship Sank an Enclave | Strange Maps | Big Think)
Little Germany was the first major non-Anglophone ethnic enclave in New York…. It was centred around Tompkins Square, which the Germans called der Weisse Garten (‘the White Garden’), in an area now known as Alphabet City. Eventually, it would include 400 city blocks on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Known to its inhabitants by the diminutives Kleindeutschland or Deutschländle (the second a distinctly southern German variant), Little Germany was also called Dutchtown…. To outsiders, Little Germany may have appeared a chaotic cauldron of otherness, but like many ethnic enclaves before and since, it was in fact itself a delicate balance of the regional differences back home. Germans from particular areas in the old country tended to congregate in the same neighbourhoods of their new home.
  • The 10th ward saw the heaviest concentration of Prussians, who by 1880 represented about 30% of the city’s German-born population.
  • In the 1860s, the 13th ward was the focal point for Hessians, who later migrated north towards the 11th and 17th wards. By the 1880s, the 13th ward had become a popular destination for immigrants from Baden. And particularly for Hanoverians, who formed their own ‘Little Hanover’ in the 13th.
  • By the 1860s, Wurttembergers had started moving into the 17th ward, from areas further south.
  • Curiously, Prussians and Bavarians seemed repelled by each other’s presence. Bavarians were spread evenly throughout Little Germany, but usually inversely with Prussians.
(via 663 - Death of Little Germany: How a Ship Sank an Enclave | Strange Maps | Big Think)
Now that I have incorporated myself, I have legally created another person with my name in the eyes of the law. In the USA my corporate self now has not only the same but even more rights and benefits than I do as an individual. My corporate self takes on any responsibility and I am not liable for its actions or debt, only my initial investments. …
As the founder of my corporation I turn over my skills, capital, possessions and intellectual property to it and these become its assets and increase its value. My identity (name, appearance and IP addresses) become the brand and are trademarked; my mental abilities (knowledge) as processes and strategies; my physical abilities as equipment; my biological functions as products, my data is the corporations property and the shares are my potential. These all become assets that I can now capitalise on. My debt is turned into the corporations liability, which actually increases the company’s value if it were to be sold. By issuing shares I can raise capital, based purely on my potential success. In exchange the shareholder has partial ownership of my corporation 
(via Jennifer Lyn Morone™ Inc, the girl who became a corporation - we make money not art, plus see also http://jenniferlynmorone.com/
Now that I have incorporated myself, I have legally created another person with my name in the eyes of the law. In the USA my corporate self now has not only the same but even more rights and benefits than I do as an individual. My corporate self takes on any responsibility and I am not liable for its actions or debt, only my initial investments. … As the founder of my corporation I turn over my skills, capital, possessions and intellectual property to it and these become its assets and increase its value. My identity (name, appearance and IP addresses) become the brand and are trademarked; my mental abilities (knowledge) as processes and strategies; my physical abilities as equipment; my biological functions as products, my data is the corporations property and the shares are my potential. These all become assets that I can now capitalise on. My debt is turned into the corporations liability, which actually increases the company’s value if it were to be sold. By issuing shares I can raise capital, based purely on my potential success. In exchange the shareholder has partial ownership of my corporation
(via Jennifer Lyn Morone™ Inc, the girl who became a corporation - we make money not art, plus see also http://jenniferlynmorone.com/
unconsumption:


When your smartphone reaches the end of its brief life, what will become of it? Will it be pawned off onto an unappreciative relative, or will it be discarded, its toxic innards eventually seeping into the earth?
Or, will it become a champion of conservation? Rainforest Connection, a San Francisco-based nonprofit with a new Kickstarter campaign out, is converting old phones into devices to detect illegal logging and poaching in the rainforest in real-time.

Again, we don’t normally tout Kickstarter stuff here, but this has already hit its goal, and sounds fascinating. More here: A Network of Recycled Phones Is Listening for Illegal Logging in the Rainforest | Motherboard

unconsumption:

When your smartphone reaches the end of its brief life, what will become of it? Will it be pawned off onto an unappreciative relative, or will it be discarded, its toxic innards eventually seeping into the earth?

Or, will it become a champion of conservation? Rainforest Connection, a San Francisco-based nonprofit with a new Kickstarter campaign out, is converting old phones into devices to detect illegal logging and poaching in the rainforest in real-time.

Again, we don’t normally tout Kickstarter stuff here, but this has already hit its goal, and sounds fascinating. More here: A Network of Recycled Phones Is Listening for Illegal Logging in the Rainforest | Motherboard

Composer Jonas Hummel and audience member for 3DMIN @ roter salon. 

Composer Jonas Hummel and audience member for 3DMIN @ roter salon. 

MONK: Hello, young explorer…. MONK: I am training explorers like yourself to rid themselves of cognitive biases. Cognitive biases are instances in which humans consistently make irrational decisions. Would you like a lesson? (from Adventures in Cognitive Biases)

MONK: Hello, young explorer…. MONK: I am training explorers like yourself to rid themselves of cognitive biases. Cognitive biases are instances in which humans consistently make irrational decisions. Would you like a lesson? (from Adventures in Cognitive Biases)

Let me suggest that, in the fraught and unpredictable world in which we live, both of those ideals – total certainty and perfect reward – are delusional. That’s not to say that we shouldn’t try to increase knowledge and reward success. It’s just that, until we reach that utopia, we might want to come to terms with the reality of our situation, which is that our lives are dominated by uncertainty, biases, subjective judgments and the vagaries of chance. … There’s something liberating, maybe, in being able to acknowledge that the reasons we have are often inadequate, or downright poor. Without needing to impose any supernatural system, it’s not hard to picture a society in which chance plays a more explicit, more accepted role in the ways in which we distribute goods, determine admissions to colleges, give out jobs to equally matched applicants, pick our elected leaders, and make personal decisions in our own lives.

graphic design student sat down opposite me with Ortlieb backpack-convertible pannier, put on his Sennheisers, whipped out then refilled his Lamy from his hand sewn pencil case and got to sketching on linen paper. i am nervous; i don’t have time to be caught up in a William Gibson novel and yet clearly, this branded scene setting is foreshadowing the shit out of an oncoming eruption of Teutonic zeitgeist plot developments. Halp.

Australia can finally sleep sound knowing it is safe from rapees and torturees: The plucky little prime minister stands up for us all against the cruel oppression of young women who have callously refused to shield us from feeling bad about crushing the last hope in their family’s ruined lives. What bitches. Garn, Tones. Bless you for finally picking a fight we can win. (via Tony Abbott: We will not capitulate to moral blackmail – video)

Australia can finally sleep sound knowing it is safe from rapees and torturees: The plucky little prime minister stands up for us all against the cruel oppression of young women who have callously refused to shield us from feeling bad about crushing the last hope in their family’s ruined lives. What bitches. Garn, Tones. Bless you for finally picking a fight we can win. (via Tony Abbott: We will not capitulate to moral blackmail – video)

the facebook app interface after the last update is vastly improved. the streamlined home screen prioritises the essential information rather than the previous deluge of procrastination, nonsense and empty, vicarious social experience that previously cluttered it up. 5 stars.

the facebook app interface after the last update is vastly improved. the streamlined home screen prioritises the essential information rather than the previous deluge of procrastination, nonsense and empty, vicarious social experience that previously cluttered it up. 5 stars.

Some will object: but people who believe in pseudosciences—whether creationists or anti-vaxxers or climate change deniers—already know they’re in a minority! And far from being worried about it, they treat it as a badge of honor. They think they’re Galileo, that their belief in spite of a scientific consensus makes them heroes, while those in the giant central component of the trust graph are merely slavish followers. I admit all this. But the point of an eigentrust system wouldn’t be to convince everyone. As long as I’m fantasizing, the point would be that, once people’s individual decisions did give rise to a giant connected trust component, the recommendations of that component could acquire the force of law. The formation of the giant component would be the signal that there’s now enough of a consensus to warrant action, despite the continuing existence of a vocal dissenting minority—that the minority has, in effect, withdrawn itself from the main conversation and retreated into a different discourse. Conversely, it’s essential to note, if there were a dissenting minority, but that minority had strong trunks of topic-relevant trust pointing toward it from the main component (for example, because the minority contained a large fraction of the experts in the relevant field), then the minority’s objections might be enough to veto action, even if it was numerically small. This is still democracy; it’s just democracy enhanced by linear algebra.
Eigenmorality Fascinating mashup of graph theory, Markov modelling, prisoners dilemmas, Plato, morality and some tasty links, with a pretty entertaining discussion in the comments; worth reading the whole thing.

According to a New Study, Nothing Can Change an Anti-Vaxxer’s Mind

This reaction, where people become more assured of their stupid opinions when confronted with factual or scientific evidence proving them wrong, has been demonstrated in similar studies time and time again. (This is why arguing with your Facebook friends who watch Fox News will only bring you migraines.) Mooney suggests that state governments should respond by making it harder to opt out of vaccinations. That would be helpful, but there’s also some preliminary research from the James Randi Educational Foundation and Women Thinking Inc. that shows that re-framing the argument in positive terms can help. When parents were prompted to think of vaccination as one of the steps you take to protect a child, like buckling a seat belt, they were more invested in doing it than if they were reminded that vaccine denialists are spouting misinformation. Hopefully, future research into pro-vaccination messaging, as opposed to just anti-anti-vaccination messaging, will provide further insight. 

(Source: Slate, via Florian Hanke)

Alternative ideas for climate change denialists too?