Cynthia Dwork and Aaron Roth’s Differential Privacy Book is Here

Not only is it an important theme, it also tells you a lot about academic publishing.

You have 3 options for obtaining a copy! (I must admit to not quite understanding the pricing model of our publisher).

  1. Hard Copy: You can buy a hard copy directly from NOW for $99 […] or from Amazon for $101[…]
  2. "ebook" format (which I believe is just a downloadable pdf): If you don’t have room on your book shelf, and are happy with a PDF, the book can be yours from NOW for only $240.[…] This is a bargain — coming in at 281 pages, this is less than 86 cents per digital “page”. 
  3. Free download: The PDF is also available for free on my web page.[…]

Vital national interests will change. Perceptions may not.

Eric Drexler at maximum pith:

Quadrennial Defense Review – May 1997
Section III: Defense Strategy

When the interests at stake are vital…we should do whatever it takes to defend them, including, when necessary, the unilateral use of military power. U.S. vital national interests include, but are not limited to:

  • protecting the sovereignty, territory, and population of the United States….
  • ensuring uninhibited access to key markets, energy supplies, and strategic resources….

In the foreseeable future, access to foreign markets, energy supplies, and strategic resources will become unimportant, while avoiding an unpredictable arms race will become critical. We need to be able to discuss scenarios in which potential military technologies and national interests will both be transformed.

Mildly perturbed to find non-trivial numbers of anki flashcard reviews at 4am. 3am is where the real action is though, check that out.

Anyway, the key point here is that German flashcards are ca. 1.5% of my waking life, and I apparently know about 4000 of them. At this rate I will have, wortschatzmässig, the speaking age of a 6 year old by February. Sweet.

Everyone needs to come to this.Filastine and Nova play Zürcher Theater Spektakel
And he started writing letters to all of the London papers who had records of his 2003 extradition to France and conviction for corruption in France over the Elf-Acquitaine scandal. Where he had been involved in taking kickbacks on selling the invaded Kuwaiti governments’ oil refineries in order to fund their operations while Iraq had occupied it. So the Guardian pulled three articles from 2003. So they were five years old. They had been in the Guardian’s archive for 5 years. Without saying anything. If you go to those URLs you will not see “removed due to legal threats.” You will see “page not found.” And one from the Telegraph. And a bunch from some American publications. And bloggers, and so on. Important bits of history, recent history, that were relevant to an ongoing presidential campaign in the United States were pulled out of the intellectual record. They were also pulled out of the Guardian’s index of articles. So why? The Guardian’s published in print, and you can go to the library and look up those articles. They are still there in the library. How would you know that they were there in the library to look up, because they are not there in the Guardian’s index? Not only have they ceased to exist, they have ceased to have ever existed. Which is the modern implementation of Orwell’s dictum that he controls the present controls the past and he who controls the past controls the future. Because the past is stored physically in the present. All records of the past.

Transcript of secret meeting between Julian Assange and Google CEO Eric Schmidt (via ravelite)

Digital archiving also means digital deleting. The cost of rewriting the past attains new economies of scale.

(This particular snippet is about potentially-dirty US campaign finance involving Tony Rezko, Nadhmi Auchi and the UK law firm Carter Ruck, who apparently are masters of UK’s already-advanced expertise in recording everything but vanishing the inconvenient parts.)

Aside: Holy shit, can Assange really just pull out these killer lines foe 5 hours running? Whatever his shortcomings, that dude is sharp.

I knew that getting records of my malfeasance vanished was a service available in the UK to the sufficiently wealthy (1, 2) but the offerings of information vanishment services really are astounding. Is there a brochure I can have should I strike it rich and need to decided which country to can offer me the best deal to emigrate to?

NB I’ve corrected small non-semantic transcriptions errors  in this excerpt.

Ambrose Bierce and Gustav Flaubert are back. On tumblr. TL;DR Wikipedia

Ambrose Bierce and Gustav Flaubert are back. On tumblr. TL;DR Wikipedia

Peter Nash SSBD, according to the indictment, was the lowest-ranked of the three pseudonyms, having a role only in the Silk Road discussion forums and not on the marketplace. The USA requested Nash’s extradition upon his arrest. Under Australian law, unless the subject of an extradition request can show “special circumstances”, that person must be remanded in custody. Consequently, Nash was remanded in a Brisbane jail[…] Subsequent reports had him bashed by prison guards following a prisoner protest in which he had no part. Nash was extradited to the USA in June 2014. He is now remanded in a federal penitentiary in New York, meaning he has so far served nine months awaiting trial.
Accused Silk Road staff: where are they now? I didn’t know that under Australian law, being accused by a foreign state of managing an online discussion forum they found objectionable could lead to you being remanded for 9 months (and counting) awaiting trial in a federal penitentiary. It hardly seems… er… Let me phrase it another way: What are the virtues of this arrangement?
Even with an ethics setting adjusted by you, an accident victim hit by your robot car could potentially sue the car manufacturer for (1) creating an algorithm that makes her a target and (2) allowing you the option of running that algorithm when someone like her—someone on the losing end of the algorithm—would predictably be a victim under a certain set of circumstances.

Here’s a Terrible Idea: Robot Cars With Adjustable Ethics Settings

Now, why not take it further? Codify the sincerely held beliefs of your particular sect and lobby car manufacturers to enshrine them in machine ethics; surely that is part of the right of freedom of religiion. Have your machine target people based on the statistical likelihood of them being an unbeliever, or a fornicator, or jewish or muslim, or a tax evader. For bonus points, found a new religion with a Turing-complete ethical code, and now your car is in a certain early Neal Stephenson book.

howthebodyworks:

howthebodyworks:

howthebodyworks:

Sudden horrified realisation: It was supposed to be a War on Typographical Error, but we lost it before we even began when Bush fat-fingered the press release. Now that would have been a war to make the world a safer place for me.

Al-QWERTYa could have been even now in retreat. 

The NSA would be intercepting our emails merely to run spell-checkers before sending them on.

Putting i before e, except after liberty.

howthebodyworks:

howthebodyworks:

Sudden horrified realisation: It was supposed to be a War on Typographical Error, but we lost it before we even began when Bush fat-fingered the press release. Now that would have been a war to make the world a safer place for me.

Al-QWERTYa could have been even now in retreat. 

The NSA would be intercepting our emails merely to run spell-checkers before sending them on.

howthebodyworks:

Sudden horrified realisation: It was supposed to be a War on Typographical Error, but we lost it before we even began when Bush fat-fingered the press release. Now that would have been a war to make the world a safer place for me.

Al-QWERTYa could have been even now in retreat. 

Sudden horrified realisation: It was supposed to be a War on Typographical Error, but we lost it before we even began when Bush fat-fingered the press release. Now that would have been a war to make the world a safer place for me.

These fine startup ideas - Apps from a Broken Bubble - have unfortunately all be snookered by the net neutrality thing.

These fine startup ideas - Apps from a Broken Bubble - have unfortunately all be snookered by the net neutrality thing.